Robin Hopper

Robin Hopper

Mariposa County Unified School District Superintendent Robin Shaw Hopper brought up-todate information about Mariposa schools to Mariposa Yosemite Rotary Club last week.

Mariposa County Unified School District Superintendent Robin Shaw Hopper brought up-todate information about Mariposa schools to Mariposa Yosemite Rotary Club last week.

Mariposa is one of seven counties in the state with a combined county office and school district. That is, Mariposa County Unified School District (MCUSD) includes all public schools in the county.

This also means there is only one governing body for the county, the MCUSD school board. The vision and mission guiding the district reads “Our students will be responsive, productive and competitive in a global society.” Our mission is to empower all students with enriching learning opportunities so they can reach their full potential.”

Mariposa County High School is the largest school in the county with about 550 students. The largest elementary schools are Woodland Elementary and Mariposa Elementary School.

State funding provides for “necessary small schools” enabling the district to support smaller school populations. Included among these schools are Greeley Hill Elementary, Coulterville High School (housed on the Greeley Hill campus), Lake Don Pedro Elementary, El Portal Elementary, Yosemite Park High School and Yosemite Valley Elementary. Severely handicapped students are served by Monarch Academy. Spring Hill Continuation School provides alternative education.

Several new projects are in place in the school district. “Count Me In” works to increase the attendance rate throughout the district. For each student regular attendance is important to his or her learning. Missed school days can put a student behind classmates surprisingly quickly.

Whereas many California districts have attendance rates over 96 percent, Mariposa’s rate for 2012-2013 was only 93.23 percent. That rate increased to 93.78 percent for the 2013-2014 school year. Principals are working to increase attendance 2 percent this school year. An added benefit is that the 2 percent improvement would equate to a $285,000 increase to the district’s general fund.

A second project is digital conversion. This refers to a transformation from a paper-based world to a primarily digital world, in which every student and teacher has access to a personal computing device and the Internet anytime and anywhere.

This does not mean the end of paper and bound books. It does mean access to information beyond textbooks. At this time, every Mariposa County high school student has a personal Chromebook. The older iPads are going to lower grades so that every student from third grade up will have a digital device.

Adult education is now available in Mariposa. Residents who want to go back to school, learn to read or complete a high school education can now do so locally.

Source Link – https://www.mariposagazette.com/articles/hopper-discusses-county-schools-at-rotary-meeting/

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